Why Therapy Does Not Work for Autism Treatment

Why Therapy Does Not Work for Autism Treatment

Immediately when your child is diagnosed with Autism you must get therapy and specialist help right away…at least that’s what we are told by the mainstream masses. And yet, doesn’t it seem strange to you that while therapy and specialist intervention is pushed so strongly as being necessary for our kids, nobody can guarantee results?  Ever wondered why therapy does not work for autism treatment?  I didn’t think to question the absurdity of this when my son, Aaron, was first diagnosed with autism at age three. I was too reactive to think straight, I guess.  They said my son needed physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and a behavioral interventionist 5 days a week when he was diagnosed, so I did what everybody in my shoes does. I freaked out and lined everything up as quickly as I could, and then I naively expected to see him progress just because I did what they said I should do. But after watching my little guy fail all his IEP’s and slip further into the abyss of autism in spite of the specialist intervention help, I wised up. I became PROactive instead of Reactive, and I figured out that there were things I could do to recover my son, but it wasn’t what the “experts” were telling me. The Motive Behind Typical Therapy: To Correct Autism Symptoms The truth is that therapy for autism treatment is being pushed so strongly because most people aren’t sure what else to say or do with an autistic child. They say “Get Help” but they can’t specify what the help will actually accomplish.  It’s just...
How to Help a Child with Autism

How to Help a Child with Autism

We all want to help our kids. But what do we do when what they need is more than we can seem to give? Or more than we can seem to even understand? And what about how to help a child with autism? Welcome to just one of the many challenges of raising a child on the autism spectrum. When my son was diagnosed with autism at age 3, my desire to help him led me to make all the wrong decisions. Autism Regression I made wrong decisions about his diet, about therapy, about schooling and education, and I even made wrong decisions in my parenting approach. Being that I didn’t really understand how to help my child, my decisions for him were based on what “professionals” told me would be best.  Well, his autism became more severe over the course of his first year of treatment… and I had become painfully aware that in my effort to help my child, I must have been doing something really, really, wrong. How else could his regression and unbearable behavior be explained? I wasn’t willing to accept the notion that this was just our destiny as many professionals inferred.  The common attitude was that autism gets worse with age, and so that my son’s future was lost and we were doomed as a family. I found this totally unacceptable. So, I made the decision to cut off all ties to the help and advice I was receiving from the mainstream and I resolved to recover my child on my own. Autism Recovery Indeed, it’s a damn good thing I made that call, because...
Aaron’s Story of Autism, Food, and Me

Aaron’s Story of Autism, Food, and Me

Welcome to TheDamageUndone.com. My name is Patrisha Leybovich. I’m 34 yrs old, and I’ve been married to my wonderful husband, Ben, since 2002. We have two beautiful children together. They are twins, age 4.5, named Aaron and Isabella. My husband Ben and I moved to Lima from Cincinnati, Ohio in 2002 to build The Music Factory – a non profit music school where I am both Administrative Director and one of 7 teachers. TheDamageUndone.com fulfills a purpose in my life to share with you everything I know about my son’s onset of autism and the many challenges our family has had to face along our journey to heal him. We have used a combination of strict dietary intervention, biomedical treatment, play therapy, and chiropractic therapy throughout his healing process. Through my journey to heal my child I have gained a perspective that says autism is on the rise. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) reports the following stats: 1960’s and 1970’s only 5 kids in 10,000 This number doubled to 1o kids in 10,000 by 1980’s Reports in the early 2000’s indicated between 10-20 cases per 10,000 It then increased to two to six cases per 1,000 or between 1 in 500. Recently in 2009 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control revised the autism prevalence rate to a staggering one in 110 children. In 2013, the statistics are now 1 child in 50 with males as more likely to be affected than females. What that says to me is that today its my child, tomorrow its your child and the day after that it will be your...